Author Archives: The Acadiensis Blog

About The Acadiensis Blog

The Acadiensis Blog is a place for Atlantic Canadian historians to share their research with both a scholarly and general audience. We welcome submissions on all topics Atlantic Canadian. If you are interested in contributing to the blog, please contact Acadiensis Digital Communications Editor Corey Slumkoski at corey.slumkoski@msvu.ca.

Linda Kealey reviews Stephen Harold Riggins and Roberta Buchanan, eds. Creating A University: The Newfoundland Experience.

Stephen Harold Riggins and Roberta Buchanan, eds. Creating A University: The Newfoundland Experience. (St. John’s: ISER Books, 2019). By Linda Kealey I opened this collection of 32 short essays with great interest as I spent 22 years teaching in Memorial … Continue reading

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Bonnie Huskins reviews Stephen Davidson’s Birchtown and the Black Loyalist Experience From 1775 to the Present

Stephen Davidson. Birchtown and the Black Loyalist Experience From 1775 to the Present (Halifax: Formac Publishing Company Limited, 2019). By Bonnie Huskins This book is a fitting tribute to two groups of African-Nova Scotians: the black loyalists who established, in … Continue reading

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New issue of the Journal of New Brunswick Studies

The editorial board of the Journal of New Brunswick Studies/Revue d’études sur le Nouveau-Brunswick (JNBS/RÉNB) is pleased to announce the release of its latest issue. The new issue can be accessed at https://journals.lib.unb.ca/index.php/JNBS/index. JNBS/RÉNB is an online, multi-disciplinary journal that … Continue reading

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Enslaved in Nova Scotia: The Case of Rose Welch

By Robyn Brown There once was a young woman gave birth to a baby while living in a small outport of Nova Scotia. Unmarried, she delivered alone in a bedroom of the house where she lived; no one in the … Continue reading

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Remembering Michael S. Cross

By Peter L. Twohig When I heard that Michael died, I just wanted to hear his voice again. So I listened to a lecture he gave at Memorial University in 1983. The lecture series on Canadian and Working Class history … Continue reading

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CFP: Atlantic Canada Studies Conference 2020 in Maine

2020 Atlantic Canada Studies Conference: Crossing Borders, Bridging Boundaries Call for Papers The Canadian-American Center and the Department of History at the University of Maine invite proposals for the 2020 Atlantic Canada Studies Conference to be held at the University … Continue reading

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Nova Scotia Readers and Boston Booksellers in the Early Nineteenth Century

By Keith Grant In the early decades of the nineteenth century, the circulation of books was a highly localized activity.[1] Although advances in steam, stereotyping, and stamps were taking place, before about 1840 in most places outside the metropole the … Continue reading

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CFP: Critical Perspectives on Cannabis in Canada

CALL FOR PAPERS Special Issue of Journal of Canadian Studies “Critical Perspectives on Cannabis in Canada” Guest Editors: Michael Boudreau and Sarah Hamill Deadline: December 1, 2019 For much of the twentieth century, recreational drugs, notably cannabis, have been seen … Continue reading

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“Be … In this Place”: Conceptions of Atlantic Canadian Citizenship

By Sarah King The Atlantic Canadian perspective is often glaringly absent from national narratives on politics and history – including CBC documentaries like 2000’s Canada: A People’s History (for a thorough discussion of this, see Margaret Conrad’s (2001b) article in … Continue reading

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Christo Aivalis reviews Cecil Foster. They Call Me George: The Untold Story of Black Train Porters and the Birth of Modern Canada (Windsor, Ontario: Biblioasis, 2019).

By Christo Aivalis Cecil Foster in They Call Me George offers readers an excellent piece of accessible writing and analysis that skillfully melds together the multifaceted histories of labour, diplomacy, politics, gender, race, empire, and culture. In so doing, Foster … Continue reading

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