Author Archives: The Acadiensis Blog

About The Acadiensis Blog

The Acadiensis Blog is a place for Atlantic Canadian historians to share their research with both a scholarly and general audience. We welcome submissions on all topics Atlantic Canadian. If you are interested in contributing to the blog, please contact Acadiensis Digital Communications Editor Corey Slumkoski at corey.slumkoski@msvu.ca.

The Visionary World of Maritime New Lights

By David Bell Some years ago a Vermont family kindly allowed access to the Maritime portions of the journal of their ancestor, Ziba Pope. Pope (1779-1852) was a Massachusetts-born trader and entrepreneur. By ca 1807 he was living in the … Continue reading

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George Elliott Clarke and Donald Wright interviewed about the Acadiensis bibliography of Black history in Atlantic Canada

Information Morning, Fredericton’s morning show, interviewed George Elliott Clarke and Donald Wright about the Acadiensis bibliography of Black history in Atlantic Canada. Prepared by Suzanne Morton and Donald Wright, copyedited by Stephen Dutcher, and published in the spring issue, the … Continue reading

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Call for Papers: Atlantic Canada Studies Conference 2022 / appel de soumissions : La Conférence d’études sur le Canada atlantique 2022

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History, Memory, People, and Place: The Spring 2021 Issue of Acadiensis

For half a century, Acadiensis has supported a scholarly conversation between past and present, expanding the definition of history, memory, people, and place in the process and making it an impressive run of intellectual life both in the region and … Continue reading

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On Davies’ Fort Frederick

By Leanna Thomas Thomas Davies served under British Colonel Robert Monckton in the Atlantic Canada region from 1757-1759 as a soldier and an artist.  During this period of the Seven Years’ War, Davies provided the military with topographical drawings intended … Continue reading

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Michael Boudreau reviews Keith Mercer, Rough Justice: Policing, Crime, and the Origins of the Newfoundland Constabulary, 1729-1871 (St. John’s: Flanker Press Limited, 2021).

Review of Keith Mercer, Rough Justice: Policing, Crime, and the Origins of the Newfoundland Constabulary, 1729-1871 (St. John’s: Flanker Press Limited, 2021). By Michael Boudreau The Newfoundland Constabulary, currently known as the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary (the “Royal” designation was bestowed … Continue reading

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Review of Nova Graphica: A Graphic Anthology of Nova Scotia History

By Mark J. McLaughlin Perceptions about the comics medium have shifted dramatically over the last few decades. Not so long ago, comics were viewed by many as something to be read by children and the semi-literate. However, in the 1980s … Continue reading

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A Tale of Two Solitudes? Historians, Archivists, and New Brunswick’s Indian Day Schools

By Richard Yeomans Since the announcement made by Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation on May 27, 2021 that the remains of 215 Indigenous children were found in an unmarked mass grave, the discovery has been reported as a tragic and … Continue reading

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Les officiers militaires français et les miliciens de la Nouvelle-France, 1755-1760

Lauraly Deschambault et Gregory Kennedy, Université de Moncton[1] Introduction Dans le cadre du projet de partenariat, Service militaire, citoyenneté et culture politique au Canada atlantique, 1700-2000, nous menons une étude sur la contribution des miliciens acadiens et canadiens à la … Continue reading

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Prince Philip’s Atlantic Canadian Legacy

By Barry MacKenzie Much has been made in recent weeks about the life and legacy of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. It seems that every organization, community and individual has been scrambling to emphasize their own connections to this oldest-living … Continue reading

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